Maintaining Access

After successfully compromising a host, if the rules of engagement permit it, it is frequently a good idea to ensure that you will be able to maintain your access for further examination or penetration of the target network. This also ensures that you will be able to reconnect to your victim if you are using a one-off exploit or crash a service on the target. In situations like these, you may not be able to regain access again until a reboot of the target is preformed.

Once you have gained access to one system, you can ultimately gain access to the systems that share the same subnet. Pivoting from one system to another, gaining information about the users activities by monitoring their keystrokes, and impersonating users with captured tokens are just a few of the techniques we will describe further in this module.

 

Keylogging

After you have exploited a system there are two different approaches you can take, either smash and grab or low and slow.

Low and slow can lead to a ton of great information, if you have the patience and discipline. One tool you can use for low and slow information gathering is the keystroke logger script with Meterpreter. This tool is very well designed, allowing you to capture all keyboard input from the system, without writing anything to disk, leaving a minimal forensic footprint for investigators to later follow up on. Perfect for getting passwords, user accounts, and all sorts of other valuable information.

Lets take a look at it in action. First, we will exploit a system as normal.

Read more @ offensive-security.com/metasploit-unleashed/Keylogging

 

Meterpreter Backdoor

After going through all the hard work of exploiting a system, it’s often a good idea to leave yourself an easier way back into the system later. This way, if the service you exploited is down or patched, you can still gain access to the system. To read about the original implementation of metsvc, go to http://www.phreedom.org/software/metsvc/.

Using the metsvc backdoor, you can gain a Meterpreter shell at any point.

One word of warning here before we go any further. Metsvc as shown here requires no authentication. This means that anyone that gains access to the port could access your back door! This is not a good thing if you are conducting a penetration test, as this could be a significant risk. In a real world situation, you would either alter the source to require authentication, or filter out remote connections to the port through some other method.

First, we exploit the remote system and migrate to the ‘Explorer.exe’ process in case the user notices the exploited service is not responding and decides to kill it.

Read more @ offensive-security.com/metasploit-unleashed/Meterpreter_Backdoor

 

Persistent Backdoors

Maintaining access is a very important phase of penetration testing, unfortunately, it is one that is often overlooked. Most penetration testers get carried away whenever administrative access is obtained, so if the system is later patched, then they no longer have access to it.

Persistent backdoors help us access a system we have successfully compromised in the past. It is important to note that they may be out of scope during a penetration test; however, being familiar with them is of paramount importance. Let us look at a few persistent backdoors now!

 

Netcat Backdoor

In this example, instead of looking up information on the remote system, we will be installing a netcat backdoor. This includes changes to the system registry and firewall.

First, we must upload a copy of netcat to the remote system.

Read more @ offensive-security.com/metasploit-unleashed/Netcat_Backdoor

 

Meterpreter Service

After going through all the hard work of exploiting a system, it’s often a good idea to leave yourself an easier way back into the system later. This way, if the service you exploited is down or patched, you can still gain access to the system. Metasploit has a Meterpreter script, persistence.rb, that will create a Meterpreter service that will be available to you even if the remote system is rebooted.

One word of warning here before we go any further. The persistent Meterpreter as shown here requires no authentication. This means that anyone that gains access to the port could access your back door! This is not a good thing if you are conducting a penetration test, as this could be a significant risk. In a real world situation, be sure to exercise the utmost caution and be sure to clean up after yourself when the engagement is done.

Once we’ve initially exploited the host, we run the persistence script with the ‘-h’ switch to see which options are available:

Read more @ offensive-security.com/metasploit-unleashed/Meterpreter_Service

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